• “You will bear witness for us”: Suppressed Memory and Counterhistory in Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch’s “Hope’s War” (2001)

“You will bear witness for us”: Suppressed Memory and Counterhistory in Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch’s “Hope’s War” (2001)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.19195/0301-7966.58.5
Mateusz Świetlicki
Google Scholar Mateusz Świetlicki
Publikacja:

Abstrakt

Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch’s historical novels and picturebooks for young readers have gained significant commercial and critical recognition in North America. Interestingly, Ukraine, her grandfather’s homeland, has remained the central theme in her works ever since the publication of the picturebook Silver Threads in 1996. The author of this essay argues that by telling the suppressed, untold stories, hence bringing attention to the next-generation memory of the traumatic experiences of Ukrainian Canadians, Skrypuch puts them on the landscape of Canadian collective and cultural memory and challenges the false generalizations attributed to Ukrainians and Ukrainian Canadians in North America after the Second World War. After briefly outlining the history of Ukrainian immigration to Canada, and explaining the roots of the negative stereotypes attributed to Ukrainians, the author analyzes Hope’s War (2001), Skrypuch’s first Ukrainian-themed novel, and shows that by highlighting the unexpected similarities between the experiences of the protagonist’s grandfather, who during the Second World War was a member of the UPA, and the anxieties of contemporary teenagers, Skrypuch evokes empathy in mainstream and diasporic readers and enables the formation of next-generation memory.

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